Publications

Fred Mann and New Art Projects are delighted to launch our series of artist publications, conceived as a critical reaction to the restrictions of lockdown. In these unprecedented times, the gallery wishes to continue to engage with critical debate surrounding the work we love and the exhibitions and artists we seek to support.

10 Adam Hennessey

New Art Projects are delighted to present the tenth  in our series of artist publications. This catalogue accompanies Adam Hennessey’s third exhibition at the gallery called ‘Adam and Steve’ . This show looks back to his awkward teenage years growing up gay in the 1990’s. Hennessey describes his new paintings as “memory fantasies”. He uses a reduced palette of greens, to create an artificial light that helps to set the scenes in them, in the past. Like watching an old film or discoloured home movie the figures move through a distorted green haze acting out his teenage dreams and desires. With thanks to Phil King for his critical essay, and to CHK Design for their beautiful design work.


09 Kate Belton

New Art Projects are delighted to present the ninth in our series of artist publications. This catalogue accompanies our first solo show by Kate Belton. For her first solo show at New Art Projects, Kate Belton started making works on paper, working in mono print and watercolour. Her subject matter is at first glance, landscape, however ideas of memory, pattern and repetition also inform her compositions. The works for this exhibition are centred on the east end of London and developed using photographs taken by the artist of the surrounding area. However these are not formal compositions, the references are taken from the hinterland, the edges of the city: canal towpaths, abandoned buildings, land about to be re-developed, or overlooked in the regeneration of the area. With thanks to Lizzie Lloyd for her critical essay, and to CHK Design for their beautiful design work.


08 Alex Hudson

New Art Projects are delighted to present the eighth in our series of artist publications. This catalogue accompanies our first solo show by Alex Hudson. His new paintings are deeply rooted in the Northern European painting tradition and seek to both celebrate and debate the cultural highs of the last 500 hundred years. These paintings playfully dip in and out of the Dutch Golden Age, making playful references to Frans Hals comedic portraits, Melchior d’Hondecoeter’s moody and characterful depictions of birds, small mammals and fruit while looking closely at English myth and literature. With thanks to Christabel Stewart for her critical essay, and to CHK Design for their beautiful design work.


07 Fergus Hare

Fred Mann and New Art Projects are delighted to launch the seventh  of our series of artist publications. This fully illustrated beautiful book documents  the work of Fergus Hare. We are very grateful Jenny Uglow for her supporting essay. As many of you know during lockdown my gallery has endeavoured to support artists by creating high quality publications, that really increase the understanding of what makes these artists so great. I am therefore excited today to launch a career monograph on Fergus Hare which is as always free to read and enjoy. Thanks to CHK design for the beautiful work.


06 Zachari Logan

New Art Projects are delighted to announce the launch of the sixth  in our series of free online artists publications. This is to accompany Zachari Logan’s exhibition at the gallery – Tales from the Bone Garden.
Forward by Fred Mann, essays by Giovanni Aloi and Mark Pilkington.


05 Kadie Salmon

Fred Mann and New Art Projects are delighted to launch the fifth of our series of artist publications, conceived as a critical reaction to the restrictions of lockdown. This beautiful book is a monograph of the work of Kadie Salmon, and fully illustrated. We are very grateful to the authors of the supporting essays: Emma Wilson of Cambridge University and Maria Walsh of Chelsea College of Arts. This book continues in our aim of matching the best in critical dialog with the artists we support. We would also like to thank Christian Kusters and Barbara Nassisi of CHK design for their beautiful and sensitive design.


04 Rob Voerman – Colony

In these unprecedented times, the gallery wishes to continue to engage with critical debate surrounding the work we love and the exhibitions and artists we seek to support. For this publication we are indebted to Bill Arning for his insightful essay, to Christian Trippe for his installation photography and to CHK design for the design of this book and the design of our forthcoming series of books. We could also like to thank The Dutch Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and Roel van de Ven, the Head of Culture, for their exceptional support of this project.


03 Desolate Beauty Lindy Usher

Frogmore has published an outstanding experimental pamphlet of poetry by novelist Lindy Usher. It was produced by New Art Projects, London, in association with us and Art First Gallery,  designed by Christian Kusters at CHK Design, and features specially commissioned art work by John Lee Bird

The book deals with the devastating effects of loss of speech through stroke. Usher suffered a series of strokes at a relatively young age and has here created a sequence of poems about Caspar David Friedrich, Hans von Bülow, Lovis Corinth, Kurt Schwitters and Otto Dix, all of whom suffered strokes. Sue Hubbard notes that Usher ‘takes the fractured shards of language and rebuilds them bit by painful bit to create something that both reflects, yet reaches beyond, this life-changing experience’.

The pamphlet was launched on 26 January 2019 at New Art Projects in London. Here are some pictures of the happy occasion, which showed the complete set of John Lee Bird’s artwork and also reunited almost the complete fleet of staff of Shipley Art Booksellers (70, Charing Cross Road, London) from c.1998, 20 years later.



02 Permindar Kaur

Permindar Kaur’s work investigates integration and belonging, particularly cultural identity and childhood. Through the exploration of adaption, mimicry and mirroring, she examines different strategies of integration and assimilation. She aims to challenge cultural constraints, acceptability and the rejection of difference. A running theme throughout all the work has been protection and defence. Whether through the use of armour, daggers or claws, any method of defence is limited and self-defeating. Soft fabric figures wearing armour/ claws hang limply unstuffed, unable to fight or shield themselves. Text by Ian Hunt


01 James Rielly

Rielly’s works are instantly recognisable for both their subtlety and the inherent darkness of their message. Poised between investigations into child psychology and the distinctly adult, his paintings and watercolours seem to function as a kind of “rite of passage” between the horror of childhood and the horror of adult life. Except that in Rielly’s works we never quite finish the transition. We remain trapped in the space between a kind of innocent horror represented by a cruel childhood humour and a particular version of what growing up might eventually mean. Forward by Fred Mann.


All books designed by CHK Design